Research Task on Ancient Egypt, 2013 / Night of Notables …

Click on the snippet from your research task in order to download it.

Roslyn square avatarDear 7C,

Today there are two tasks vying for your attention.

♦The first is a short research task on ancient Egypt.
♦The second is preparation for the Night of Notables.

Some of you still need to choose the person you would like to research. Others are ready to start reading and taking notes.

Last year my students really enjoyed the research and the event. Here are some comments from them:

 

People keep saying to me, "Did you taste that girl's macaroons?" I reply, "You mean Brooke. She's one of MY students." They repeat the question: "But did you taste them?" No, but just looking at them made me happy.
Brooke’s Macaroon Tower, Night of Notables, 2012

Brooke: Overall, the night was very memorable and significant and something that I’ll remember for a long time…Leading up to the occasion everyone was in quite a rush to put the finishing touches to their tables. If I had to improve something looking back now, I would have preferred to have a more structured table that was presented more clearly. Something that stood out to me on the night was the atmosphere that surrounded the room, everyone was full of energy.

Caleb: What I really liked about the Night of Notables was everyone’s costumes. It was good to see everyone in their costumes and relate them to their notable person. Something that I thought I did well leading up to the evening was having everything already organised so that I did not have to run out at the last minute for a costume or add-ons to the poster.

Gus's costume made everyone want to play the next level.
Gus’s costume, Night of Notables, 2012

 I am proud of my poster and how it looked. Considering how much work I put in, I hoped it was going to turn out well and I think it did. Something that I think I could have done better is having more interactive things on my table. This I think would have brought more people to my table and food would also do the same.

I think that Gus and Lachlan had the best setup. They had interactive things such as games on the computer and awesome outfits to go with their notable person.

Year 7C History Research Task 2013

DUE DATE: Two weeks after the term holidays

Here is a link to the British Museum site, which will provide a wealth of possibilities for the task on finding a primary source on ancient Egypt. Look on the left-hand side of the page at the “highlight objects”.

British Museum – thousands of artefacts from all around the world

This website will also help you to appreciate the life of an Egyptian peasant farmer:

PBS Website – A day in the life of a peasant farmer

Kind regards,

Ms Green.

 

The Pecking Order of Ancient Egypt

Chooks peck the chooks that are below them in status, while they submit to being pecked by those above them. This hierarchy is evident in many human interactions, though it is rarely quite so straightforward and predictable. In the society of ancient Egypt, people certainly knew their place; their position in society was unlikely to change much in the course of one lifetime. If you were born a peasant farmer, you were overwhelmingly likely to die a peasant – after a life of intensive labour and anxiety about survival. In comparison, these chooks seem very happy, even if some of them have to put up with a bit of pecking. Picture kindly provided by Ms Gordon.

Dear 7B,

Ancient Egyptian society was a kind of hierarchy in which some people had more power, status and importance than others. Some people got to boss others around, make them work and get them to pay taxes. Most of the people, who were peasant farmers, worked hard, were told what to do and paid taxes to those above them in the hierarchy.

Some anthropologists call this a kind of human pecking order.

The original type of pecking order was first observed by a biologist called W. C. Allee. He noticed in the 1920s that chooks peck each other according to their power or status in the farmyard. The most powerful chook pecks all the others. The least powerful chook is pecked by all the others. In between are the chooks who are pecked by those above them and who peck those below them. This concept of a pecking order is used to denote a hierarchy of power.

For instance, in our school Mrs Mitchell is above me in the pecking order and, I’m sorry to say, you are below me. Although I would never peck you, I do tell you what to do, badger you about your homework and talk endlessly about history while you feel more or less obliged to listen. That’s a bit like pecking, if you think about it.

Of course, human relationships are much more complex than those of chooks. In ancient Egypt, the people at the top had responsibilities as well as privileges, but they certainly wielded much more power than those at the bottom. The lowly peasant farmers had to work hard, sometimes on the pharaoh’s projects, sometimes on their own farms. The yearly ebb and flow of the Nile flood determined their existence.  In your new role as Emit and Llatiwonk, you need to describe and comment on this society.

The sources below will help you to find out about the Nile and the people who established their lasting civilization on its banks. Remember to write notes that will help you to complete your Emit Repoons/Llatiwonk assignment, which is due on Wednesday 27 March.

For those students whose assignment handouts mysteriously disappear into the dark, fathomless corners of their school bag, rapidly breaking down and becoming illegible and untouchable, download your assignment here: 

Emit Repoons 2013

Glossary
General Specific to Ancient Egypt

hierarchy

pecking order

status

power

role

privileges

artisan

scribe

pharaoh

Nile

yearly flood/inundation

vizier

hieroglyphics

mummification

nomarch

high priest/ess

This picture of an Egyptian peasant figure working a plough behind two oxen was kindly provided by the British Museum.

The importance of the Nile – BBC Website

Questions and answers about the Nile – an easy website

A day in the life of various ancient Egyptians – PBS Website

A fascinating account of archaeological evidence on who actually built the Pyramids – PBS website

Global Egyptian Museum for Kids 

The Role of the Pharaoh from the British Museum

The Role of Slaves in Ancient Eygpt 

History for Kids

7C Research Task

Click on the snippet from your research task in order to download it.

Dear 7C,

Do you lose your handouts in the dark recesses of your bedroom, only to discover them two months later, mashed between an old apple core and your football or netball jumper? If so, this is just what you need: a link so that you can download your work at home or at school.

Year 7C History Research Task 2012

DUE DATE: Thursday 23 August

Here is a link to the British Museum site, which will provide a wealth of possibilities for the task on finding a primary source on ancient Egypt. Look on the left-hand side of the page at the “highlight objects”.

British Museum – thousands of artefacts from all around the world

This website will also help you to appreciate the life of an Egyptian peasant farmer:

PBS Website – A day in the life of a peasant farmer

Kind regards,

Ms Green.

 

From the Fertile Crescent to Ancient Egypt

The “Natufians” were hunter-gatherers whose descendants eventually became the first farmers and herders in the Fertile Crescent. Ultimately a great civilisation developed in that region. The people of that civilisation were called the Sumerians and they are generally credited with inventing the wheel and developing the first alphabet. These were remarkable achievements for people with hardly any wood, whose best material for a writing surface and for building houses was mud.

Photo kindly provided by Mrs McQueen

The ancient Egyptians built the Great Pyramid of Giza without the wheel. In addition, they developed their own system of writing, probably influenced by the Sumerians. The ancient Egyptians usually get the credit, among other things, for domesticating cats, embalming bodies with great skill and living successfully in a land that, except for a thin fertile strip near its river, was basically desert. It was an improbable place for such a major and successful civilisation, made possible only by the existence of that river, the Nile, and by the talents of the people. Every year the Nile delivered its fertile silt to the inhabitants of the Nile Valley, its floodwaters sweeping down from the Ethiopian mountains in the south to the plains of the north. Every year the Egyptian peasant farmers used that silt and water to crop their land and grow the food that supported the whole population.

Some of my students think it would have been much easier for human beings once they started to farm. My students point out that people would no longer have encountered as much danger from hunting and would have felt more confidence about having food when they needed it. While these are fair points, farming in ancient Egypt was labour-intensive, to say the least. A peasant farmer was also at the bottom of the social hierarchy. This was no easy life. Hunter-gatherers six or seven thousand years before in a fertile area like the Fertile Crescent might well have had more leisure time and fewer people telling them what to do – and no one to tax them as well.

Find out about ancient Egypt at these links, ensuring that you make notes on topics that could help with assignment research:

Mummy Maker Game at the BBC Website

The importance of the Nile – BBC Website

The importance of the Nile – an easier website

Questions and answers about the Nile – an easy website

A day in the life of various ancient Egyptians – PBS Website

A fascinating account of archaeological evidence on who actually built the Pyramids – PBS website

Our legacy to the world

thoughtDear 7B,

Sometimes I have dreams of how people will remember me. These dreams are usually positive but occasionally – well, a little embarrassing.

♥”She was a very good knitter. Look, she made me this scarf.”

♥”She was funny. Well, peculiar, actually.”

♥”She helped me on my first day of school when I got hopelessly lost and ended up in the cleaner’s broom cupboard.”

Hmm, well. I know they’re not the most wonderful things to be remembered for, but they’re possibilities.

What would you like to be remembered for?

lab_pouring_test_tube pd wpclipartcom

♥”That boy made a gadget that caused the i-Pad 3 (whoops, I mean the new i-Pad) to stop selling. Apple had to give him a job before he put the company out of business.”

♥”That girl became a great scientist and found a cure for breast cancer.”

♥”That boy figured out how to power Melbourne with recycled garbage from two high schools, four office blocks and an alpaca farm.”

♥”She was such a warm, kind person.”

♥”He was a wonderful father. Every night he told his children stories and they hung on his words.”

Everyone leaves some kind of legacy – and I don’t mean money. I mean an attitude of mind, a skill, an action or an achievement, hopefully one that is memorable and worthwhile, that lasts for many years and influences others.

Leonardo da Vinci - a great legacy
Leonardo da Vinci - a great legacy (photo kindly provided by Dee McQueen)

 

The Colosseum - a legacy of great architecture and blood sports (photo kindly provided by Dee McQueen)
The Colosseum - a legacy of great architecture and, less admirably, blood sports (photo kindly provided by Dee McQueen) Can you think of other arenas based on this concept?

In the context of a civilisation, a legacy means a special contribution that a civilisation leaves behind. It might include:

♦a memorable idea such as a special way of organising a society or dealing with a problem;

♦some kind of scientific knowledge;

♦an invention;

♦a monument;

♦a skill;hieroglyph river wpclipart pd

♦an impressive achievement in art, government, literature, etc;

♦something that later societies have admired and sought to emulate.

For instance, the ancient Sumerians are believed to have been the first to create a writing system. They pressed wedge-shaped marks into clay tablets. Many historians believe that this is what gave the Egyptians the idea of developing hieroglyphs.

Cuneiform – clipart kindly provided by www.phillipmartin.info (I always think that it would be wonderful if the first writing was created to write love poems or great literature. But no – someone wanted a receipt. Sigh. This is a material world.)

Here’s a quotation from an article about the 20-year history of the internet, by Guy Rundle in The Age on Sunday 15 March, 2009:

“Five thousand years ago, the invention of writing in Mesopotamia [Sumer] separated information from presence – a few strokes of cuneiform on a clay tablet established that meaning, intent, communication could be separated and transmitted without a person there to present it.

“From this event flows every modern institution of the state…”

That’s some legacy!

The ancient Egyptians had many achievements over the course of their long history. Their beautiful tomb paintings, for example, show us all about their lives on the Nile River. They drew figures in a way that changed little over the years. Can you think of other great and inspiring achievements that others might have built upon?

 

Egyptian peasants during harvest – note the side-on presentation of the bodies in classic Egyptian style

Image in public domain from wikimedia.commons

See what you can find out about the legacies of the ancient Egyptians at these sites.

Pharaoh by Ros

♦Mathematics:

http://www.suite101.com/content/the-mathematics-of-ancient-egypt-a49376

♦Ancient Egyptian ideas about pi:

http://ualr.edu/lasmoller/pi.html

♦Ancient Egyptian art:

http://www.aldokkan.com/art/art.htm

water_drop wpclipartcom pdAncient Egyptian water engineering and inventions:

http://www.waterhistory.org/histories/nile/t1.html

(You’ll need to scroll down to read the vital information.)

Managing time – calendars and clocks:

http://library.thinkquest.org/J002046F/technology.htm

Ancient Egyptian writing:

http://www.ancientscripts.com/egyptian.html

Write a comment in answer to this question: What legacy would you as an individual like to leave behind? Another way to put this could be: How do you intend to leave the world a better place than you found it?

Some revision of the past, a game and a quiz

Cruelty to children in the state education system...

Dear 7B,
At some stage in their lives, all students are cruelly confined in a darkened room and forced to write almost non-stop for 48 minutes, without recourse to books, without help from their teacher and without any electronic gadgets to aid them.

Requests for toilet visits, drinks and any kind of nutrition are denied them.

While they work like slaves for a harsh taskmaster (or mistress), they are watched by a woman of uncertain age and intimidating appearance, who wanders around the room, admonishing them and urging them on. Sometimes her encouragement is almost harder to bear than the ordeal itself.

This gruesome test of courage and perseverance is called a test. Tests give high school teachers a little score to write in their markbooks and show to parents on parent-teacher night. Tests are a bitter reminder that education is not just about learning but also about getting little numbers allotted to your name on the roll.

The week after next you will be completing one of these daunting tasks. That’s why I’m giving you a couple of friendly little revision tasks to do, as well as a link to a BBC game on mummification.

The games will be fun. But don’t forget, the test will be horrid, unless you use the games to ace the test, keep that mean old woman happy and show the Education Department, once and for all, what you’re made of. Play hard. Try to remember everything. Good luck.

Kind regards from Ms Green

 

Next, a little quiz on ancient Egypt.

Lastly, you can visit the wonderful BBC website and play Mummy Maker. In this game, you can learn by making mistakes as well as by not making them. I love games like that.
Mummy Maker Game

Moving on from the Stone Age to the world of ancient Egypt

Welcome back from camp, 7B. Hope you’ve dried out!

Click on this link to complete a multiple choice quiz on the Stone Age. Some of the answers will be easier if you paid close attention to the video, “Stories from the Stone Age”. Good luck!

Stone Age Quiz Link

 

…there is no country that possesses so many wonders…

Herodotus

This picture of modern Egypt with its ancient wonders was kindly provided by Mrs McQueen in the library. She has more exciting holidays than I do, though I must admit, I have climbed those ancient stones myself. There's a photo below, in which I look uncomfortably hot. That was back in 1987.
This picture of modern Egypt with its ancient wonders was kindly provided by Mrs McQueen in the library. She has more exciting holidays than I do, though I must admit, I have climbed those ancient stones myself.

Egypt has a great fascination for historians. 

Remember, I'm a god. Even though I suffer from abscesses on my teeth and other mortal problems.
Remember, I'm a god - even though I suffer from abscesses on my teeth and other mortal problems.

Herodotus, a man from ancient Athens who is often dubbed the “father of history”, found the culture of the Egyptians strange as well as fascinating. You may feel the same as you wander the desert sands, sail across the Nile and show your embalming skills on our class mummy. I hope so.

♦Read up on the process of mummification

Play the Mummy Maker Game at the BBC website by clicking here

Read about the power of the Pharaohs here

View the treasures of Tutankhamen here

Another Resource for Studying Ancient Egypt

The World Book Online is a brilliant resource, which you can even access from outside through the intranet or this blog. You will need the username (bhhs) and password (worldbook) to use it, however.

Screen shot 2010-08-17 at 4.00.04 PM

Quiz and a greeting from Toolangi

Hi, 7X!

You’ll really enjoy this camp next year. The forest is mossy and velvety and the activities are full of adventure. There’s even one called the “possum glider” where you put on a harness and, with the help of your classmates, are lifted into the air, there to glide magically like a flying creature (or a gliding possum, in any case).

Today, however, you can spend some time on your assignment and do some extra work on ancient Egypt by attempting the quiz below. Don’t forget that there are explanations of each answer, so you can learn quite a bit by reading these carefully.

I’ll be back tomorrow. I hope your subs and your class captains are treating you kindly and that you are treating them kindly.

Kind regards,

Ms Green.

The flow of history: the gift of the Nile

…there is no country that possesses so many wonders…

Herodotus

This picture of modern Egypt with its ancient wonders was kindly provided by Mrs McQueen in the library. She has more exciting holidays than I do, though I must admit, I have climbed those ancient stones myself. There's a photo below, in which I look uncomfortably hot. That was back in 1987.
This picture of modern Egypt with its ancient wonders was kindly provided by Mrs McQueen in the library. She has more exciting holidays than I do, though I must admit, I have climbed those ancient stones myself. There's a photo below, in which I look uncomfortably hot. That was taken back in 1987. Since then I've become cool...

Egypt has a great fascination for historians. In fact, the study of ancient Egypt has its own “-ology”. In today’s class you will be doing some reading and activities to induct you into the world of the Egyptologist. Then, you’ll be concocting an adventure in ancient Egypt, in the role of a small impulsive alien, whose name is Emit Repoons. He gave my blog its name and there’s an explanation of his identity on this page.

But back to Egypt. The study of this long-lived and intriguing civilisation has been around for a long time. Herodotus, the man who has been dubbed the “father of history” by some, visited ancient Egypt in the mid 5th century BC; by that time, the civilisation had already been in existence for thousands of years. Nevertheless, the knowledge of how to read hieroglyphs was lost a few hundred years later, and for at least one and a half thousand years no one was able to decipher all those beautiful pictorial symbols. Then a man called Jean-Francois Champollion broke the code. His stroke of genius meant that thousands of primary sources could suddenly be read. It was a huge boost for Egyptology and the study of history.

Remember, I'm a god. Even though I suffer from abscesses on my teeth and other mortal problems.
Remember, I'm a god - even though I suffer from abscesses on my teeth and other mortal problems.

I’m saving Champollion’s story, however, for another day. Today is strictly introductory. But keep in mind that in the 1800s and early 1900s there were huge numbers of historians and archaeologists trying to get the story of ancient Egypt down pat. Many were from England, which explains why many great Egyptian treasures may be seen in London in the British Museum, along with some Greek marbles. (There’s been great controversy over whether the British should give the Elgin marbles back – and countless other treasures of antiquity.)

One of the reasons Herodotus was interested in Egypt was that he found the culture of the Egyptians strange as well as fascinating. You may feel the same as you wander the desert sands, sail across the Nile and show your embalming skills on our class mummy. I hope so.

♦Read up on the process of mummification HERE, then

Play the Mummy Maker Game at the BBC website by clicking here

Read about the power of the Pharaohs here

View the treasures of Tutankhamen here

Convert your name to hieroglyphs here

Ros sitting on the Great Pyramid, 1987 Ros in Egypt 1987

↑I went to Egypt in 1987. It was hot, fascinating and hot!

Resources for Studying Ancient Egypt

The School Library has now bought the World Book Online. This is a brilliant resource, which you can even access from outside through the intranet or this blog. You will need the username (bhhs) and password (worldbook) to use it, however. Ask Ms Green or Mrs McQueen to give it to you so that you can use the link below:

Screen shot 2010-08-17 at 4.00.04 PM

Here are some more websites to whet your curiosity about this ancient civilisation:

♥Click on these links to find out more about the Nile River:

http://www.ancient-egypt-online.com/river-nile-facts.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/nile_01.shtml (for serious readers only!)

♥Click on these links to discover details of the lives of peasant farmers:

http://www.egyptologyonline.com/Work%20&%20Trade.htm

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/specials/1624_story_of_africa/page89.shtml (This site explains that it was peasant farmers rather than slaves who were responsible for the great monuments of ancient Egypt.)

♥The British Museum provides a timeline of ancient Egyptian history at this link:

http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/time/explore/main.html

♥For a detailed account of how the ancient Egyptians made beer and bread, go to:

http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/prehistory/egypt/dailylife/breadmaking.htm

♥To read about Hatshepsut, a rare woman pharaoh, go to:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/hatshepsut_01.shtml

Legacies of Ancient Egypt – and 7X

A legacy in this context means a special contribution that a civilisation leaves behind. It might include:

Clipart kindly provided by www.phillipmartin.info A famous piece of ancient architecture. Can you think of other arenas based on this concept?

  • a memorable idea such as a special way of organising a society or dealing with a problem;

  • some kind of scientific knowledge;

  • an invention;

  • a monument;

  • a skill;

  • an impressive achievement in art, government, literature, etc;

  • something that later societies have admired and sought to emulate.

For instance, ancient Sumerians are believed to have been the first to create a writing system. They pressed wedge-shaped marks into clay tablets. Many historians believe that this is what gave the Egyptians the idea of developing hieroglyphs.

Here’s a quotation from an article about the 20-year history of the internet, by Guy Rundle in The Age on Sunday 15 March:

“Five thousand years ago, the invention of writing in Mesopotamia [Sumer] separated information from presence – a few strokes of cuneiform on a clay tablet established that meaning, intent, communication could be separated and transmitted without a person there to present it.

“From this event flows every modern institution of the state…”

That’s some legacy!

Cuneiform – clipart kindly provided by www.phillipmartin.info I always think that it would be wonderful if the first writing was created to write love poems or great literature. But no – someone wanted a receipt. Sigh. This is a material world.

The ancient Egyptians had many achievements over the course of their long history. Their beautiful tomb paintings, for example, show us all about their lives on the Nile River. They drew figures in a way that changed little over the years. Can you think of other great and inspiring achievements that others might have built upon?

Egyptian peasants during harvest – note the side-on presentation of the bodies in classic Egyptian style
Image in public domain from wikimedia.commons

See what you can find out about the legacies of the ancient Egyptians at these sites.

****************************************************************Mathematics:

http://math.suite101.com/article.cfm/the_mathematics_of_ancient_egypt

Ancient Egyptian ideas about pi:

http://ualr.edu/lasmoller/pi.html

Ancient Egyptian art:

http://www.aldokkan.com/art/art.htm

Ancient Egyptian water engineering and inventions: http://www.waterhistory.org/histories/nile/t1.html

(You’ll need to scroll down to read the vital information.)

Managing time – calendars and clocks: http://library.thinkquest.org/J002046F/technology.htm

Ancient Egyptian writing:

http://www.ancientscripts.com/egyptian.html

Your task: Leave a comment describing the ancient Egyptian legacy you consider most interesting, significant or worthwhile.

Then answer this question: What legacy would you as an individual like to leave behind? Another way to put this could be: How do you intend to leave the world a better place than you found it?

My legacy…

Deciphering ancient Egypt

Ever felt like writing your diary in a dead language? I can picture you saying, “I’m all for scholarship and intellectual brilliance, but I’m not silly. What point could there be in that?”

Jean-Francois_Champollion_2 PD Wikimedia

The picture shows Jean-Francois Champollion. It is a public domain image from wikimedia.commons.

It just so happens that one man did just that and his eccentric act led to unexpected benefits for the study of history. As a boy Jean-Francois Champollion, the man credited with the decipherment of hieroglyphics, used to write his journal in Coptic, the language used by the early Christian Church in Egypt, but long since dead. A language is considered dead when no living child speaks it as his mother tongue. No living child had spoken Coptic for almost two thousand years, but it turned out to be the only written language that could provide clues to the sounds of ancient Egyptian speech.

______________________________________________________________

Never suspecting that Coptic might supply the vital link to understanding hieroglyphics, Champollion learned it as a teenager, along with several other dead languages. It was knowledge that he placed on the back-burner of his mind. One day that knowledge would burst into flame. One day it would illuminate the study of ancient Egypt.

________________________________________________

In order to read the fascinating story behind the decipherment of ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics, go to this link:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/decipherment_01.shtml

_______________________________________________

As you read, look for answers to these questions (and perhaps write or type brief notes to add to your assignment):

  • There was a false hypothesis that hampered many scholars as they tried to decipher hieroglyphs. What was it?

  • What was the Rosetta Stone and why was it a key to understanding hieroglyphics?Rosetta Stone in BM, our photo

  • How did the recognition of the cartouche help with the process of decipherment?

  • When and how did Champollion finally work out that the hypothesis was wrong and that the “soul of hieroglyphics”, as he later wrote, was phonics?

******************************************************************************

There is of course a moral to this story. (There’s a moral to all my stories.) You may think something you’re learning now is nothing but whimsy on your part or a cruel imposition by your teachers. Put it on the backburner and let it gently simmer. One day in a decade or two it might help you to find a job, learn a new and wonderful skill, make another person happy, or change the world.

Kind regards,

Ms Green


Emit and Llatiwonk take off

Emit 1 copy

Whoops! I hope you don’t mind having a teacher who is out of the loop. Imagine that – I decide that I’ll give you your first test on a day when you’re all on camp. If you hadn’t kindly told me, picture the lonely classroom, the blank test papers…Well, honestly. I’m changing the date to Thursday 4 March. That way I can correct your tests over the long weekend. I wouldn’t want to spend too much time relaxing. My brain might become even more addled.

Now that you have your assignment sheet and are rocketing off with Emit and Llatiwonk, here are some internet links to help you find information. Of course you could find them on your own, but this will make your life easier, with any luck. And don’t forget to beat a path to your nearest public library. Where else can you go and check out an unlimited number of books and have people smile and wave at you?

Keep in mind that Emit is keen, curious and questioning. He can be wild and rash, take risks and do crazy things in his search for knowledge. Llatiwonk, on the other hand, is rational, careful and thorough. Who do you think is more like you? (You can do some self-analysis and leave an answer to this question in a comment if you like.)

Begin your adventure by looking at some of these sites on ancient Egypt…

Play the Mummy Maker Game at the BBC website by clicking here 

Read about the power of the Pharaohs hereEgyptian figure by Edy      Edy’s Egyptian figure (7F 09) 

View the treasures of Tutankhamen here

Convert your name to hieroglyphs here

Click on this link to find out more about the Nile River:

http://www.ancient-egypt-online.com/river-nile-facts.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/nile_01.shtml (for serious readers only!)

Farming in Egypt today JB

This photo and the one in the header were taken by John Bayley, a friend who could easily get a job with National Geographic but instead lets me use his photos to my heart’s content without any monetary reward.

Peasants

Sources suggest that peasant farmers made up about 80% of Egypt’s population. The most likely way to raise one’s status was through learning to write, but this would not have been easy for many peasant farmers to do. They had many other onerous tasks and they paid a very substantial proportion of their grain in tax – some sources suggest over half.

Here are some links about the lives of peasants:

http://www.egyptologyonline.com/Work%20&%20Trade.htm

http://www.egyptologyonline.com/Work%20&%20Trade.htm

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/specials/1624_story_of_africa/page89.shtml (This site explains that it was peasant farmers rather than slaves who were responsible for the great monuments of ancient Egypt.)

 For a detailed account of how the ancient Egyptians made beer and bread, go to:

http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/prehistory/egypt/dailylife/breadmaking.htm

To read about Hatshepsut, a rare woman pharaoh, go to:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/hatshepsut_01.shtml

To read about the rights of Egyptian women, go to:

http://www.womeninworldhistory.com/form6.html

In order to compare Egyptian women’s rights to those of the ancient Greeks: http://www.library.cornell.edu/colldev/mideast/womneg.htm

Landing in the Desert Sands of Ancient Egypt

Nile at night JB “Egypt is the gift of the Nile.” (Herodotus)

Another photo from the magical lens of John Bayley

Thanks for all your interesting comments, 7E. Here’s a little introductory quiz on ancient Egypt.

After you have done this quiz, read the websites below it about farming and the importance of the Nile and the life of farmers in ancient Eypgt. Armed with this knowledge, start writing your assignment. 

Click on these links to discover more about the Nile River and its importance to ancient Egypt.

http://www.ancient-egypt-online.com/river-nile-facts.html

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/nile_01.shtml (for serious readers only!)

 

Click on these links to discover details of the lives of peasant farmers:

http://www.egyptologyonline.com/Work%20&%20Trade.htm

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/specials/1624_story_of_africa/page89.shtml (This site explains that it was peasant farmers rather than slaves who were responsible for the great monuments of ancient Egypt.)

 

For a detailed account of how the ancient Egyptians made beer and bread, go to:

http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/prehistory/egypt/dailylife/breadmaking.htm