Those Clever Ancient Greeks – Part 2

You could set out your research task something like this – but of course with information in the box!

Welcome back from holidays, 7C!

As you already know, many people from ancient Greece were remarkably influential, impressively inventive and downright clever. For instance, there was Euclid, who figured out the rules of geometry and whose textbooks were used in schools until the 19th century. There was Homer, who is credited with writing down the legends of Odysseus and the Trojan War and whose stories have intrigued and inspired people ever since. There was the poet Sappho, whose work only survives in fragments – yet those fragments are so surpassingly beautiful, so intense and so memorable, that modern people still read her work with wonder. I could go on, but I want you to discover an ancient Greek thinker for yourselves. Here is your task:

Choose ONE of the great Greek thinkers listed below. Try to read two or three websites and one or two books about that person. The books could include an encyclopedia in the library or a dictionary or encyclopedia of biography.  Once you have found your information, design an attractive and eye-catching page about your famous Greek. Your page should include:

♦a summary of the person’s achievements

♦what you find interesting or admirable about him/her

♦quotations attributed to the person

♦diagrams representing inventions or mathematical principles, etc.

♦an attractive heading

♦a mini bibliography

♦symbols representing the person’s ideas or achievements (for instance, I have chosen a question mark for Socrates, because he was famous for asking questions)

 

 

Recommended Websites

Summary and other links: http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/Homework/greece/famous.htm

Homer: http://greece.mrdonn.org/odyssey.html

Homer again: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/homer.shtml

Archimedes: http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/science/math/archimedes.htm

Archimedes again: http://www.ancientgreece.com/s/People/Archimedes/

One more Archimedes site: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/archimedes.shtml

Euclid: http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/science/math/euclid.htm

Aristotle: http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/aristotle.htm

Socrates: http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/socrates.htm

Eratosthenes: http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/science/math/eratosthenes.htm

Sappho: http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/318

Pythagoras: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/pythagoras.shtml

 

Those Clever Ancient Greeks

A Task for 7C:

Even the school pillars show the influence of ancient Greek architecture.

First student: “The pillars at the front of the school? Hmm, would you say they’re Doric,Greek columns from istockphoto.com pd Ionic or Corinthian?”

********************

Second student: “We’re just starting to study geometry and trigonometry in Maths.”

********************

Third student: “I’d like to take Philosophy in Year 11. I’ve heard the teacher is very good. She uses the Socratic method…”

********************

Fourth student: “You know one thing I hate about school? It’s so undemocratic. The teachers are all despots.”

********************

Every single one of these statements touches on the legacy of the ancient Greeks. We might have arrived at all of these concepts without them, but since we can never know what would have been in history, we can’t be sure.

Now there’s a philosophical question…

You are about to visit another ancient civilisation, one whose influence reaches, as the examples above show, to the present day.

By the way, all the photos in this post were taken by my brother Ern during his trip to Greece. I am using them with his permission. 

 

Write brief answers IN SENTENCES to the questions below, using the websites provided or your textbook.

 

♦What does the word “philosophy” mean?

http://dictionary.reference.com

/browse/philosophy (There are six definitions given. Look for the one you find easiest to understand.)

♦Where did the Greeks believe the gods and goddesses lived?

Read THIS SITE to discover the answer to this question.

♦Name a famous landmark from ancient Athens.

Look at the picture at THIS LINK for ideas.

♦What was the word for the market place in Athens?

http://www.athensinfoguide.com/wtsagora.htm

This site has an interactive map and many details about ancient Athens (and modern tourism).

♦Name the two most famous city-states of ancient Greece.

http://history.howstuffworks.com/ancient-greece/ancient-greece2.htm

♦Name three famous ancient Greek philosophers.

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/index.htm

♦What was Euclid famous for?

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Euclid.html

♦How did Socrates teach?

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/socrates.htm

♦What happened to Socrates and why?

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/socrates.htm

♦Name one aspect of Athenian life that was not at all democratic!

http://www.crystalinks.com/greekslavery.html

A paradox: slavery and democracy in the same time and place

 

A tiny remnant of ancient Greece in our school building – minus the slavery…

One of the reasons that I like history so much is that it is full of contradictions. Just when you think you know everything, have seen it all, you read some unexpected story or discover some absurdity. The story of history, like the story of any single person, is full of twists and turns, inconsistencies and moments (or long periods) of hypocrisy. Like slavery in ancient Athens. Now there’s a brilliant example.

The ancient Athenians are often praised for their contributions to the modern world, and yet in the midst of that seemingly free-thinking, creative society they kept thousands of slaves. Of course, so did the United States until 1865, even though they had written in the beautiful words of their Declaration of Independence in 1776 that “all men are created equal”. You can see what I mean about contradictions.

When I ask my students to describe slavery, they always say, “hard work, no pay, hardly any rights…” Then they do a double-take. “Hey!” they cry. “That sounds like us.”

But that’s an exaggeration. Your teachers don’t own you. Even your parents don’t. We adults must follow the rule of law in how we treat you. A slave, in contrast, has no rights. A slave is the legal property of another and is forced to obey the owner. The owner can oppress the slave, punish him and sometimes even kill him without any punishment.

Slavery is the topic you will be exploring today. Try to work hard. Like a slave.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/ancient_greeks/athens/

http://www.ancientgreece.co.uk/dailylife/explore/exp_set.html

What percentage of the people of Athens were slaves?
How did one become a slave? (There are several possibilities.)
What jobs were done by slaves? 

What do you think would be the most difficult aspect of being a slave? (put a thoughtful one-sentence answer into a comment)

Finally, try the “House Challenge” at this site, provided by the British Museum. You are not allowed to play this game until you have done the work above!

http://www.ancientgreece.co.uk/dailylife/challenge/cha_set.html

Kind regards from

Your friendly slave-driver,

Ms Green

A little wander through ancient Greece…

Recommended Website: http://www.wingedsandals.com/

Hypothetical Thoughts from Enquiring Minds 

School pillars copyFirst student: “The pillars at the front of the school? Hmm, would you say they’re Doric,Greek columns from istockphoto.com pd Ionic or Corinthian?”

********************

Second student: “We’re just starting to study geometry and trigonometry in Maths.”

********************

Third student: “I’d like to take Philosophy in Year 11. I’ve heard the teacher is very good. She uses the Socratic method…”

********************

Fourth student: “You know one thing I hate about school? It’s so undemocratic. The teachers are all despots.”

********************

Every single one of these statements touches on the legacy of the ancient Greeks. We might have arrived at all of these concepts without them, but since we can never know what would have been in history, we can’t be sure.

Now there’s a philosophical question…

But first, before we get to philosophy, you need to visit another ancient civilisation, whose influence reaches, as the examples above show, to the present day…

All the photos on this post were taken by my brother Ern on his trip to Greece. I am using them with his permission. 

Write brief answers IN SENTENCES to the questions below, using the websites provided or your textbook.

  • What does the word “philosophy” mean?

http://dictionary.reference.com

/browse/philosophy (There are six definitions given. Look for the one you find easiest to understand.)

  • Where did the Greeks believe the gods and goddesses lived?

Read this site to discover the answer to this question.

  • Name a famous landmark from ancient Athens.

Look at this picture for ideas.

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/government/index.htm

  • What was the word for the market place in Athens?

http://www.athensinfoguide.com/wtsagora.htm

This site has an interactive map and many details about ancient Athens (and modern tourism).

  • Name the two most famous city-states of ancient Greece.

http://history.howstuffworks.com/ancient-greece/ancient-greece2.htm

  • Name three famous ancient Greek philosophers.

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/index.htm

  • What was Euclid famous for?

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Euclid.html

  • How did Socrates teach?

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/socrates.htm

  • What happened to Socrates and why?

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/socrates.htm

The many facets of ancient Greece

Wander through the alleys and amphitheatres of ancient Greece…

CLASS WORK FOR MONDAY 6 SEPTEMBER, 2010

All the photos in this post were taken by my brother Ern on his recent trip to Greece. I am using them with his permission.

Working in pairs, and using the internet sites suggested below, write brief answers to the questions below. You may type your answers into a Word file if you prefer.

Easy questions

  • What does the word “philosophy” mean?

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/philosophy (There are six definitions given. Look for the one you find easiest to understand.)

  • Where did the Greeks believe the gods and goddesses lived?

Read this site to discover the answer to this question.

  • Name a famous landmark from ancient Athens.

Look at this picture (you can save it and colour it if you like) for ideas.

  • What form of government did Athens create?

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/government/index.htm

  • What was the word for the market place in Athens?

http://www.athensinfoguide.com/wtsagora.htm

This site has an interactive map and many details about ancient Athens (and modern tourism).

  • Name the two most famous city-states of ancient Greece.

http://history.howstuffworks.com/ancient-greece/ancient-greece2.htm

  • What invention of Archimedes was used to lift water?
  • Name three famous ancient Greek philosophers.

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/index.htm

  • What was Euclid famous for?

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Euclid.html

  • How did Socrates teach?

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/socrates.htm

Harder questions

  • What does the word “Spartan” mean when used to describe lifestyle or upbringing in the modern day (e.g. in the sentence, “He lives a Spartan type of existence”)? How does this relate to ancient Sparta?
  • What was the name of the war between Athens and Sparta in 431 to 404 BC? Who triumphed?
  • Who was Homer? Name his two famous works.
  • Aristophanes wrote a play called Lysistrata in which the women plot to stop their men from going to war. What was their plot?
  • Describe what happened when the Spartan soldiers held the pass at Thermopylae against the Persians.
  • Who was Sappho?
  • What were Spartan slaves called and how were they treated?
  • Draw a simple diagram with an accompanying formula to show Pythagoras’ theory about right-angle triangles.

The famous ancient Greeks

Hypothetical Thoughts from the Enquiring Minds of 7X

School pillars copyEvangeline: “The pillars at the front of the school? Hmm, would you say they’re Doric,Greek columns from istockphoto.com pd Ionic or Corinthian?”

********************

Reuben: “We’re just starting to study geometry and trigonometry in Maths.”

********************

Bridget: “I’d like to take Philosophy in Year 11. I’ve heard the teacher, Ms Ind, is very good. She uses the Socratic method…”

********************

Michael: “You know one thing I hate about school? It’s so undemocratic. The teachers are all despots.”

********************

Every single one of these statements touches on the legacy of the ancient Greeks. We might have arrived at all of these concepts without them, but since we can never know what would have been in history, we can’t be sure.

Now there’s a philosophical question…

Below are two tasks. You need only choose one.

In the first, you can read some quotations from Aristotle, one of the great philosophers and scientists of ancient Athens, whose influence on Western thought is incalculable. Then you can EITHER try writing an analogy like his OR a paragraph-long comment on one of his famous statements.

In the other, you can choose one of the famous ancient Greeks listed below and find out as much as possible about him or her in 20-25 minutes. Then leave a paragraph-long comment, showing your knowledge of the person but most of all your appreciation of his or her contribution to the future of human thought – his or her legacy.

Aristotle Stamp PD image supplied by School of Maths&Stats, Uni of St Andrews, ScotlandTask 1: Aristotle

  • It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.

  • A friend is one soul inhabiting two bodies.

  • Man is by nature a political animal.

  • Wishing to be friends is quick work, but friendship is a slow ripening fruit.

  • Wit is educated insolence.

  • All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire.

Choose one of these quotations and write a comment on it OR try writing an analogy like the one below:

A citizen is a member of a polis just as a sailor is a member of a ship’s crew. Each sailor has a different role according to his abilities. One is a rower, another a helmsman, another a lookout. But although they have different roles all crew members have the same aim – a safe voyage. This is also true of citizens. Although they have different abilities and different roles they have a common object – the welfare of the community of which they are members.

OR

Task 2: Another Famous Ancient Greek

Choose from one of the following:

  • Playwrights and writers: Euripides, Aristophanes, Sophocles, Sappho, Homer
  • Greek ruins - ErnScientists: Hippocrates, Archimedes, Aristarchus, Eratosthenes, Hipparchus, Aristotle, Agnodice
  • Mathematics: Euclid, Pythagoras, Archimedes
  • Philosophy: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle

Detective Work in Ancient Greece

All the photos on this post were taken by my brother Ern on his recent trip to Greece. I am using them with his permission. Thanks, Ern!

Emit has a new mission and needs your help. He’s in ancient Greece and it is your job to find out as much information as possible with him.

 

You need to gain as many points as you can, working in groups of no more than three students, and using a dictionary, your textbook and the internet sites suggested below the questions.

 

Write your answers in sentences in a WORD file and email it to me when you’ve finished, with the names of all participants in your group. Prizes will be given for the best efforts! Good luck!

TOTAL POINTS: 30

 

One-point questions

&     What does the word “philosophy” mean?

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/philosophy (There are eight definitions given. Look for the one you find easiest to understand.)

&     Where did the Greeks believe the gods and goddesses lived?

Read this site to discover the answer to this question.

&     Name a famous landmark from ancient Athens.

 Look at this picture (you can save it and colour it if you like) for ideas.

&     What form of government did Athens create?

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/government/index.htm OR SEE YOUR TEXTBOOK!

 &     What was the word for the market place in Athens?

 http://www.athensinfoguide.com/wtsagora.htm

This site has an interactive map and many details about ancient Athens (and modern tourism!).

&     Name the two most famous city-states of ancient Greece.

http://history.howstuffworks.com/ancient-greece/ancient-greece2.htm

&     What invention of Archimedes was used to lift water?

&     Name three famous ancient Greek philosophers.

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/index.htm

&     What was Euclid famous for?

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Euclid.html

&     How did Socrates teach?

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/socrates.htm

 

Two-point questions

&     What happened to Socrates and why?

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/philosophy/socrates.htm

&     Name one aspect of Athenian life that was not at all democratic!

http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/prehistory/aegean/culture/classesofathens.html

&     What does the word “Spartan” mean when used to describe lifestyle or upbringing in the modern day (e.g. in the sentence, “He lives a Spartan type of existence”)? How does this relate to ancient Sparta?

&     What was the name of the war between Athens and Sparta in 431 to 404 BC? Who triumphed?

&     Who was Homer? Name his two famous works.

&     Aristophanes wrote a play called Lysistrata in which the women plot to stop their men from going to war. What was their plot?

&     Describe what happened when the Spartan soldiers held the pass at Thermopylae against the Persians.

&     Who was Sappho?

&     What were Spartan slaves called and how were they treated?

&     Draw a simple diagram with an accompanying formula to show Pythagoras’ theory about right-angle triangles.